Rhythmic: Writing and Singing

Write a new post in response to today’s one-word prompt. Not sure how to participate? Here are the steps to get started.

Source: Rhythmic

poggio

It is a common knowledge that before the invention of the printing press, monks across various monasteries in Europe copied the books such us the holy scriptures manually through a technique called calligraphy. It has been suggested that while they were copying the books, they were also singing. The rhythm of the songs they were singing has also affected the rhythm of their writing as if they were dancing with the motion of their hands according to tune of the song being sung. The rhythmic movements of their hands were in synchronize with rhythmic counts of the song they were singing. Sometimes when I write on my journal, I also listen to Gregorian Chants, so that I could determine the accuracy of such claims. The chants have indeed determined the phase of my hand writing.

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A Good Match: Pen and Paper

This week, share a photo of things that complement each other.

Source: A Good Match

a-good-combination

What can be more traditional and mundane of a combination than a paper and pen. Among many other things, they have formidable partnership in expressing ourselves or just merely organizing our thoughts. What fascinates me is that while the digital age has made the typewriter archaic and obsolete, pens and papers are still important tools even now that our lives are becoming more and more governed by technology. Pen and paper makes conceptual ideas more tangible and more concrete. They can also make words more permanent.

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Titles that I have heard, but have not actually read

books

Quite recently, I have decided to start reading the famous novels that I have heard, but have not actually read. For instance, I have heard the titles such as Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray, The Warden by Anthony Trollope, Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, The Pride and The Prejudice by Jane Austen, War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy, and so on, but I have not really got the chance or gave myself a chance to read them. That has to change, so that when opportunity arise when I have to talk about these canonized titles, I could certainly claim in good conscience that I have acquired first-hand knowledge of those novels. If I cannot be an experienced writer, at least I could say that I am an experienced reader. And perhaps they are not mutually exclusive: one could sustain the other.

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Hideout: The Desk

desk1Write a new post in response to today’s one-word prompt. Not sure how to participate? Here are the steps to get started.

Source: Hideout

The word hideout has indeed made me thinking. I could not provide a readymade and quick response. What first comes into mind when I have encountered the word hideout? What are the feelings it provokes? Do I have a hideout? If so, where is it? How do I go there? What do I do in the hide? Is it a physical place? Say in the city? Outside the city? A park? A church? Library perhaps? Or is it more a transcendental space not bounded by the physical place? Say the hideout is a place where you are with your friends? Or a space where you write like I do now?

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Against the Odds

An unexpected victory? A snapshot of an unlikely moment? This week, show us something that defies the odds.

Source: Against the Odds

Time

When everything comes down to it, we are always at odds with time. We are victorious when we seem to forget it from time to time. But it is quite capable of inflicting pain when we are highly conscious about it.

Recognize the Unfamiliar

Source: Recognize

At first glance, to be familiar with something or someone is a prerequisite for recognition. We recognize those who are familiar to us. After all, how can we recognize something when we do not have a reference to our prior knowledge? At the same time, we do not really recognize normality do we? We are not aware when things are well and normal, but we are very conscious when things deviate from the norm. We recognize our body when there is something wrong with it. For example, I am not really conscious about my teeth when they do not hurt. When I have a tooth ache, that is the only time I can feel my teeth and recognize not only the pain itself, but also where the pain is coming from.

All anomalies are also recognizable. We recognize them because they are not like everybody else or everything. They stand out. It is precisely because they are different that we tend to recognize them. We tend to look at them in such a way that they become the object of our gaze and reduced them to preconceived stereotypes we have ascribed to them.

To recognize those who do not fit the pattern is easy. It is even an impulse some might say. We recognize those who deviates from the pattern without even trying or thinking about it. While it is easy to recognize those who are outside the orthodox straight forward structure, it is quite difficult to acknowledge their existence. To be tolerated is absolutely not the same with acceptance. To be recognized does not really equate with being acknowledged.

 

The Desk in the Cell on Solitude

This week, show us what being alone means to you.

Source: Solitude

There is a fellowship more quiet even than solitude, and which, rightly understood, is solitude made perfect – Robert Louis Stevenson

The Table in the Cell

Although I made the photograph myself, the artist you made the installation must be acknowledge. The subject of this photograph is Lino Hellings’ installation entitled ‘Papa Newsroom’ exhibited in Hacking Habitat in Gavangeniswolvenplein Utrecht. The gallery is a former prison.